Will Kim Dotcom relaunch Megaupload?

Ian Paul
20 August, 2012
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The founder of the Megaupload file-sharing and storage site, shut down in January on piracy claims, has hinted on Twitter that the popular service may return with a new music download service called Megabox.

“I know what you are all waiting for. It’s coming. This year,” Kim Dotcom said on Twitter last week. “Promise. Bigger. Better. Faster. 100% Safe & Unstoppable.”

Dotcom’s tweet may refer to Megaupload users’ outrage at losing access to personal files when the site and a number of affiliated services, including Megavideo, were seized by New Zealand and American authorities. Dotcom and several other Megaupload executives were arrested. The FBI called the Megaupload seizure one of the “largest criminal copyright cases ever brought by the United States.”

MegaUpload allowed users to upload any file and then share a download link with others. Customers protested that the takedown prevented their access to personal recordings, business documents, and other files. The fate of Megaupload user data is not resolved, but those troubles appear to be the inspiration behind Dotcom’s reference to a service that is bigger, better, safe, and unstoppable.

Megabox?

The Next Web, which first reported on Dotcom’s statement, interpreted the Megaupload founder’s tweet to be a tease for Megabox, a music service designed to let artists sell songs directly to users. Dotcom responded with a second tweet saying, “Yes…Megabox is also coming this year.” In June, Dotcom published a screenshot for the Megabox site via Instagram.

Since his arrest, Dotcom has repeatedly said Megaupload acted within the law and complied with all legal copyright takedown notices it received. Dotcom is currently fighting extradition from New Zealand to face charges in the United States. The Megaupload founder is also fighting in US court to regain control of his business.

One Comment

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  1. Paul Hatch says:

    When looking at the likelyhood of Dotcom relaunching Megaupload (as opposed to Megabox) you have to look at possible barriersto reentry into the market.

    By and Large Dotcom’s reputation and goodwill towards Megaupload not only remains intact but I would say the vindictive and protectionist nature of this prosecution has not only strengthened his position but has done so at great loss in PR and credibility of both the media companies (MPAA/RIAA(MAFIAA)) and the FBI/DOJ.

    It should be noted that the prosecution is based on fundamental disinfomation. While publicly available figures backup the claim of the RIAA that by size and global bandwidth, Megaupload was by far the largest cyberlocker. The RIAA then peddled the false conclusion that Megaupload was distributing the most pirated media. This has since been disproven by the IFPI’s own report claiming only 4% of the infringing cyberlocker traffic came from Mega,(mega by volume accounted for well over half the global locker bandwidth). The Two sets of figures are clearly at odds and leads you to wobder what the real reason for the raid (illegal) and prosecution was.

    Looking at the timing and the fact Universal was abusing the DMCA process to remove Mega publicity in the run up to the original launch of Megabox, you have the real reason for Mega being targeted.

    RIAA members offer artists nothing. In fact they exploit the artist and public alike. Megabox will go ahead I dont dount as both artists and the public win. The only losers are the Media dinosaurs within the RIAA who over time will be nothing more than righhts holders of old sound recordings of depreciating value.

    Dotcom knows that the RIAA needs to die for the long term benefit of the internet and that Megabox and it’s distribution model is capable of holing them below the waterline.

    The RIAA are fully aware of this fact hence the disinfo and lobbying for the raid.

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