Will you be able to run OS X Yosemite, iOS 8?

Jonathan Stewart
18 June, 2014
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OS X Yosemite, IOS 8, OS X Mavericks

Will your Apple devices be able to update to OS X Yosemite, iOS 8?

Apple unveiled OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 at the Worldwide Developers Conference 2014 a fortnight ago, and there are exciting updates set to launch in spring.

But despite Apple CEO Tim Cook’s determination to have all Apple owners run the latest and greatest software on their devices, iOS 8 and OS X Yosemite will not run on all devices in circulation.

Tim Cook took to the stage in the conference’s keynote to boast the success of Apple’s current release, OS X Mavericks, which is the greatest single release in Apple’s history with over 50 percent of Mac users running the operating system.

In the mobile space, Cook highlighted the 98 percent of iOS devices running iOS 7, the latest mobile operating system from the Cupertino company, released in the second half of 2013.

When Apple makes OS X Yosemite and iOS 8 public in spring, will those numbers decrease? That depends on whether Apple owners choose to purchase a compatible device.

So, what will be compatible? Who will need to upgrade their devices in order to use the new features?

Macs

OS X Yosemite brings a range of new and exciting features to the Mac. OS X 10.10 will make using your Mac a lot more enjoyable and, for the large percentage of Mac users who choose to work on their Mac, a lot more productive.

iOS 8

Apart from aesthetic changes to the interface such as transparent Finder windows, simplified Safari windows and a new font, OS X Yosemite offers massive improvements to Spotlight, the Notification Center, Mail and AirDrop. It will also integrate the new Continuity features that make iOS and OS X closer friends.

Read the full breakdown of features in OS X Yosemite here.

So, what will run OS X Yosemite? It has been reported that nearly 80 percent of Macs will be able to run OS X 10.10. A simple way to look at it is, if your Mac runs OS X Mountain Lion or OS X Mavericks, you should be fine.

According to the Yosemite system requirements, the list of Macs include:

  • iMacs from the mid-2007 model on
  • 13in MacBooks from late 2008 (aluminium case) and early 2009 (plastic case) forward
  • MacBook Pro notebooks from mid-2009 and later (13in) and late-2007 and after (15in, discontinued 17in) and on
  • MacBook Air ultra-light laptops from late 2008 and later
  • Mac mini desktops from early 2009 and after, and
  • Mac Pro desktops from early 2008 and forward.

You can check where your Mac sits by heading to the Apple logo in the top left-hand corner of your display. Click the logo, select ‘About This Mac’ and choose ‘More Info…’.

Exceptions

OS X Yosemite will require Bluetooth 4.0/LE to utilise the Handoff feature in Continuity. This limits the compatible devices for those seeking to pause work on one device and continue on another.

The list of Macs with Bluetooth 4.0/LE is as follows:

  • iMacs from late-2012 onwards
  • MacBook Pro laptops from mid-2012 onwards
  • Retina MacBook Pro laptops from mid-2012 onwards
  • MacBook Air laptops from mid-2011 onwards
  • Mac mini desktops from mid-2011 onwards, and
  • Mac Pro desktops from 2013
Options

In order to take advantage of these new features, you may need to get a new Mac. But there are a number of ways to run OS X Yosemite without the pricetag Apple attaches to its new devices. For the price-conscious, you could sell your old device and use the money gained to reduce the cost of your new Mac, you could purchase a second-hand or refurbished Mac (a good option for those looking to buy their first Mac) or you could choose to rearrange how you work.

How would you go about rearranging? Well, rather than purchasing an iMac, you may choose to purchase a Mac mini and an external display, depending on how powerful your Mac needs to be. You could update your old MacBook with a MacBook Air if you use your laptop for simple tasks.

iOS devices

iOS 7 was a major overhaul to Apple’s mobile platform and it would have been fair to assume the next edition would bring a smaller change. However, iOS 8 is another massive update for iOS users.

Besides Continuity and iCloud Drive which bring iOS and OS X closer together, iOS 8 brings third-party keyboards, QuickType, interactive notifications, new multitasking, improvements to Siri and AirPlay, Family Sharing and updates to Mail, Safari, Camera and Messages. 

iOS 8 mail 2

iOS devices able to run iOS 8 is an easier breakdown. If you have an iPhone 4s onwards you will be able to receive the update (iPhone 4s, 5, 5c, 5s devices are in) – iPhone 4 users will be stuck with iOS 7 if they don’t choose to purchase a new device.

For iPad owners, devices from the iPad 2 onwards will run iOS 8. Owners of the original iPad will have to upgrade, but iPad 2, iPad with Retina, iPad Air and both iPad mini models will be able to run the operating system come spring.

However, the fifth-generation iPod touch is the only iPod that will run iOS 8.

Exceptions

Like OS X Yosemite, iOS 8 will require Bluetooth 4.0/LE to utilise the Handoff feature in Continuity. This will mean the iPad 2 will not be able to run this feature.

Options

In order to take advantage of these new features, you may need to get a new iPhone, iPad or iPod. But again there are a number of ways to run iOS 8 without buying a new device from Apple. For the price-conscious, you could sell your old device and use the money gained to reduce the cost of your new device, you could purchase a second-hand or refurbished iOS device (a good option for those looking to buy their first Mac) or, in terms of an iPhone, change (or start) a new contract with a mobile provider.

 

Looking to sell an old device? After a cheaper, refurbished iPhone, iPad or Mac? mResell is the place to go for Australian and New Zealand Apple users.

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