Sip

Dan Frakes
2 September, 2013
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Sip

Link to: Sip

Category:
Developer Tools

Developer:
Rui Aureliano

Compatibility:

OS X 10.7 or later, 64-bit processor

Age Rating:  4+

 $0.99


Available on the App Store Buy
App Guide

If you work with colours – say, as a designer, web coder or app developer – you frequently need to find the exact colour of a particular item or pixel on your screen. Sip 1.3.2 is perhaps the easiest way to get that information.

On initial launch, you choose your favourite colour model/format from Sip’s systemwide menu. After that, you simply press Sip’s keyboard shortcut, or choose Pick Colour from its menu, and you get a magnifying circle with a single-pixel ‘bullseye’ in the middle for choosing the particular onscreen pixel you want to sample. (Sip lets you use one of three magnification levels.) Click on a pixel to sample it, and Sip copies to the clipboard the code for that colour, in the format you’ve specified.

Sip supports CSS Hex; CSS3 HSL and HSLA; CSS3 RGB and RGBA; Calibrated NSColor for HSB and RGB; Device NSColor for CMYK, HSB and RGB; UIColor HSB and RGB; CGColor Generic RGB and CMYK; raw decimal and raw 8-bit. You can cycle through available formats, as well as cycle through previously captured colours in Sip’s colour history, using convenient keyboard shortcuts – as you do, an elegant status box appears beneath Sip’s menu-bar icon, indicating the selected format or colour. (Sip also shows recently sampled colours in its menu.)

Even more convenient: after sampling a colour, changing the format automatically copies to the clipboard that format’s code for the most-recently sampled colour – you don’t have to sample it again.

Sip offers a number of options for formatting colour codes, and you can disable formats you never use. It’s a easy-to-use tool that makes quick work of an otherwise tedious task. Its only major drawback is that if you have multiple displays, the magnifying circle works properly only on your primary display.

by Dan Frakes, Macworld

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